Skip to Navigation Skip to Content

Discover the Broads' Best kept secret

The common rivers on Norfolk Broads where you can go fishing

With a collection of over 40 water-filled broads, Norfolk Broads National park provides the ideal location for all kinds of explorers and fishing lovers. The rivers stretch a combined 125 miles and the waterways are free, which provides a chance for one to cruise without any risk. The following are some of the main rivers that make up the Norfolk Broads:

Rockland Broad
Rockland Broad – Norfolk by michaeljohnbutton licensed under Creative Commons 4.0

River Ant 

River Ant provides one of the best points for fishing, and particularly during early mornings where you have higher chances of catching rudd, roach, bream, and other types of fishes. There is an area called Ludham Bridge where visitors tend to frequent due to the abundance of fish, and you can give it a try once you visit Norfolk Broads. 

River Bure 

This is the longest river on the Broads and stretches 51 kilometres right into the sea at Gorleston. Due to its length, it does not have a lot of points to fish, but one can still enjoy the sport nonetheless. The Coltishall Common, for example, has a 300 yards free area where you can catch perch and roach. However, the type of fish available in this area changes with the season since they tend to migrate to favourable locations. It all depends on whether you visit the site during the summer or winter. All in all, there is always some fish to catch. 

River Thurne 

This is a rather short river with a length of 11 kilometres. This does not mean that you cannot enjoy its free fishing at Martham Boatyard and the great view of Filby Broads and Potter Heigham. 

River Yare 

Although one of the most challenging places to fish on the Broads due to its tides, River Yare provides one of the most exciting places for the sport and has been used to host fishing competitions in the past. Some of the places you can go fishing are Cringleford Bridge and Try Surlingham where you are more likely to catch some perch and roach. 

River Wensum 

River Wensum originates from the northwest of Norfolk and merges with the Yare in Whitlingham. It is a protected river and is often used for scientific research due to its relatively small size and calm. Although one is required to pay to enjoy some services, you can fish for free at Fakenham Common. 

With all these rivers to visit, fish, and enjoy the beautiful scenes, you have all the reasons to consider Broads National Park for your next holiday.